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Prints by Ricardo Santos

Posted by Rory














“Car art” is always a contentious subject for me, there’s alot of cartoonish colored pencil stuff out there that Road & Track likes to pass off as “fine art”. If there’s one thing i’ve tried to showcase in my livery posts, it’s that the geometric body of the car itself makes for a great canvas.

Earlier last week, fellow car porn addict (although he gets paid for his addiction) Jim Lau sent me the innocuous “you’ve seen this, right?” message. Above are some examples of Ricardo Santos’ work, and I think they’re absolutely fantastic. You’ll notice some farmilar ‘faces’ from alot of the car posts I’ve done here on the blog, needless to say I’ve solved the problem of hanging up pictures of cars on my wall without looking pubescent.

These prints all come in a variety of sizes & formats, the stretched canvas is barking at me and the moths futzing outside my window will soon find a nice warm home in my wallet. You can find all of Ricardo’s works seen above over on his Society 6 page.

Reverse Of Volume

Posted by Jonathan







Reverse Of Volume was an installation by artist Yatsuaki Onishi commissioned by Rice Gallery, which ran from April 13 – July 27 2012. The suspended fabricated mountainscape is formed from two materials; plastic sheeting and black colored hot-glue. Onishi shaped the floating sculpture within the gallery space by first draping the expansive plastic piece over stacked cardboard boxes, then removing the piled components following the white sheet having been attached to the ceiling by the quick-drying adhesive. This creative process or method is known to Yasuaki Onishi as ‘casting the invisible’ and aids in his artistic meditation on the reality of negative space.


Designing With Photography


1. Initial photo (architectural feature)


2. Cropped and mirrored


3. Cropped and mirrored and layered in Image Blender


1. Initial Photo of some shadows in a corner (taken with Stilla)


2. Cropped and mirrored


3. Final Image layered in Image Blender


1. Initial photo of some stairs


2. Mirrored (you may notice a habit here)


3. Final image layered in Image Blender

The first photos I started using in my designs were simple textures. (we’ve all seen the explosion of texture sites out there) but lately I’ve been using photos to get shapes that typically I would have drawn before. This has been largely driven by having a decent camera in my pocket at all times, allowing me to capture random staircases or light hitting the corner of an architectural feature just right. I find the natural light and texture in photographs have so much more depth in the final product then what I can come up with in photoshop …and its much easier to get to the end result.

Posted by: Seth Hardie
Instagram: @hallwood

Weekend Inspiration: Chloe Aftel

Posted by Jonathan














My friend Cameron Ballensky has been in town visiting for a few days, so we’ve been out and about shooting loads of film. Me, mostly 35mm, him Polaroid. After seeing some of the unpredictable results yielded by certain films he uses, I was really turned on by the idea of exploring this format myself (also two of my favorite photographers, Reuben Wu and Neil Krug, have inspired this in me as well). Cameron mostly get’s all of his film through The Impossible Project, a company that now produces Polaroid film, and as I was exploring their site, I came across the beautiful work of Chloe Aftel, a Los Angeles based photographer and film director.

Browse through her beautiful body of work on Flickr.

Chloe is also part of The Impossible Project’s launch of a new instant film material for 8×10 cameras (image below). More info can be found here.

4 Days of Sound, Art and Inspiration

Posted by Jakub


The Art Directors Club CRE8 Series presents:
Ghostly International: Of Art and Artifice

Ghostly International and Art Directors Club collaborate on an exciting 4 day event in New York City this September showing the diversity in their artistic roster. Below is the information and schedule on what to catch and make sure to get your tickets soon, this site just launched today.

ABOUT THE EVENT

The Ghostly universe has been steadily expanding since its humble beginnings in Ann Arbor, Michigan in 1999.

The Art Directors Club begins its CRE8 series of music and art focusing on Ghostly International, a unique culture identity that has helped elevate the careers of visual artists including Michael Cina, Sougwen Chung, Andy Gilmore, Will Calcutt and Matt Shlian, while releasing work from musicians such as Matthew Dear, Com Truise, Gold Panda, Lusine and School of Seven Bells.

The Ghostly aesthetic and it’s accompanying ethos has always sought to cast off the restrictions of genre and form. An assertion that creativity, in its apolitical nature, is an act worth striving to achieve. Unconcerned with classification, Ghostly highlights the act of making in and of itself, no matter the medium.

In 2010, Ghostly launched Ghostly International Editions, a “label” of artwork and artists that has grown into a collective of some of North America’s best designers and artists.

Of Art and Artifice is not a retrospective—it is a comprehensive state of the union, a peek into what’s next after 13 years of creativity from Ghostly International, creating an essential selection of work from the Ghostly family into a never-before-seen collection.

ABOUT THE ART DIRECTORS CLUB

Founded in 1920, the Art Directors Club is the premier organization for leaders in visual communication, boasting one of the most concentrated groups of creative talent in the world. A not-for-profit membership organization, the ADC’s mission is to connect creative professionals around the globe while simultaneously provoking and elevating world-changing ideas.

SCHEDULE

Thursday
September 13th / @6pm

Opening Gala
Live music performances by:
Com Truise
Lusine
Michna (DJ)
Live projection performance by:
Sougwen Chung

Friday
September 14th / @6pm

Artist Talks Day 1
Hosted By Incase:
Michael Cina
Andy Gilmore
Will Calcutt

Saturday
September 15th / @6pm

Artist Talks Day 2
Hosted By Incase:
Matthew Shlian
Timothy Saccenti
Sougwen Chung

Sunday
September 16th

Open to public 12-5pm

TICKET AVAILABLE HERE

Weekend Inspiration: Motoi Yamamoto

Posted by Jonathan








Japanese artist Yamamoto Motoi was born in Hiroshima, Japan in 1966 and worked in a dockyard until he was 22, when he decided to focus on art full-time. Six years later, in 1994, his younger sister died from complications due to brain cancer and Yamamoto immediately began to memorialize her in his labyrinthine installations of poured salt. The patterns formed from the salt are actually quite literal in that Yamamoto first created a three-dimensional brain as an exploration of his sister’s condition and subsequently wondered what would happen if the patterns and channels of the brain were then flattened.

Although he creates basic guidelines and conditions for each piece, the works are almost entirely improvised with mistakes and imperfections often left intact during hundreds of hours of meticulous pouring. After each piece has been on view for several weeks, the public is invited to communally destroy each work and help package the salt into bags and jars, after which it is thrown back into the ocean.

Via Colossal