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VITSOE ARCHIVE

We’ve discussed Vitsoe around here before, primarily focusing on what they are most known for: Dieter Rams’ furniture designs, including the 606 Universal Shelving System and the 620 Chair Programme. Founded in 1959, they have worked with arguably some of the most influential mid century graphic designers in Germany, and their attention to detail in the company graphic identity and literature has always been just as impressive as the furniture itself. Now, Vitsoe has started to release some of it’s amazing archival material via it’s newly created Tumblr page, and it’s worth a visit.

I find myself most drawn to the posters and graphic identity that Wolfgang Schmidt created for Vitsoe early on. Being a record collector, I’m obviously obsessed with this 7″ that they pressed in the 1971 for one of the various live performance events in the showrooms.

The poster he designed in 1972 for the 620 Chair Programme is genius – it really captures the idea of ‘furniture as a system’ that both the 606 and 620 embody. Each unfolding of the poster reveals a new layout, ultimately culminating in a whimsical layout featuring the Vitsoe employees as the models.

Schmidt’s book of invitations for the Frankfurt fair in 1971 delivers humor via his iconography combinations.

Finally, Günther Kieser, most famous for his jazz and rock posters, art directed various photo shoots for Vitsoe. This is a postcard featuring one from 1968.

Bookmark the Vitsoe Tumblr page or follow the twitter feed for daily updated content.

Posted by Rob Fissmer

Weekend Inspiration: Tomas Saraceno

Posted by Jon M










Argentinian artist Tomas Saraceno goes beyond the traditional conceptions of place, time, gravity and our familiar notions of architecture. Saraceno is an artist and architect whos visions for cities floating in the air have led him to create a series of experimental structures such as balloons or inflatable modular platforms that can be inhabited and exploit natural energies. Any of his objects is an invitation to think about alternative knowledge, about emotions and the interaction with others. They invite you to participate, like Poetic Cosmos Of The Breath (pictured above), an experimental solar dome, which was part of The Arts Catalyst’s 2nd International Artists Airshow.
At dawn, crowds formed around a giant and colorful, circular foil, pinned to the ground at the edges with sand bags. Throughout the morning, the artist and his team gradually filled the foil with air and visitors could walk through this stunning colored wonderland.

Via Ignant

Ghostly International x Incase Comp

Posted by Jakub



To celebrate the Ghostly International: Of Art and Artifice event Incase shared this amazing compilation of songs which includes a Kolombo remix of Tycho, Tensnake rework of Osborne, Fort Romeau edit of Beacon and many more.

Incase is proud to support Ghostly International: Of Art and Artifice, a multi-day event presented by the Art Directors Club CRE8 Series that promotes art connected through a spirit of inventiveness and anti-genre thinking. In the years since its birth in 1999, Ghostly has grown from a boutique label known for its experimental-pop and -techno acumen to an internationally recognized platform for the work of the world’s best visual artists, designers, technologists, and musicians.
As a multi-platform cultural curator, Ghostly International is a tightly knit aesthetic universe fulfilling the roles of art gallery, design house, clothing designer, technology innovator, music-publishing company and record label, all in one. From September 13-16, The Art Directors Club will house a comprehensive exhibition that gives a peek into what’s next after 13 years of creativity from Ghostly International, highlighting an essential selection of work from the Ghostly family in a never-before-seen collection. In addition to the exhibition, Of Art and Artifice will also encompass a series of events that include an Opening Gala with live performances by Com Truise, Lusine and NYC’s own Michna, as well as two days of talks with Ghostly artists hosted by Incase.

Prints by Ricardo Santos

Posted by Rory














“Car art” is always a contentious subject for me, there’s alot of cartoonish colored pencil stuff out there that Road & Track likes to pass off as “fine art”. If there’s one thing i’ve tried to showcase in my livery posts, it’s that the geometric body of the car itself makes for a great canvas.

Earlier last week, fellow car porn addict (although he gets paid for his addiction) Jim Lau sent me the innocuous “you’ve seen this, right?” message. Above are some examples of Ricardo Santos’ work, and I think they’re absolutely fantastic. You’ll notice some farmilar ‘faces’ from alot of the car posts I’ve done here on the blog, needless to say I’ve solved the problem of hanging up pictures of cars on my wall without looking pubescent.

These prints all come in a variety of sizes & formats, the stretched canvas is barking at me and the moths futzing outside my window will soon find a nice warm home in my wallet. You can find all of Ricardo’s works seen above over on his Society 6 page.

Reverse Of Volume

Posted by Jon M







Reverse Of Volume was an installation by artist Yatsuaki Onishi commissioned by Rice Gallery, which ran from April 13 – July 27 2012. The suspended fabricated mountainscape is formed from two materials; plastic sheeting and black colored hot-glue. Onishi shaped the floating sculpture within the gallery space by first draping the expansive plastic piece over stacked cardboard boxes, then removing the piled components following the white sheet having been attached to the ceiling by the quick-drying adhesive. This creative process or method is known to Yasuaki Onishi as ‘casting the invisible’ and aids in his artistic meditation on the reality of negative space.


Designing With Photography


1. Initial photo (architectural feature)


2. Cropped and mirrored


3. Cropped and mirrored and layered in Image Blender


1. Initial Photo of some shadows in a corner (taken with Stilla)


2. Cropped and mirrored


3. Final Image layered in Image Blender


1. Initial photo of some stairs


2. Mirrored (you may notice a habit here)


3. Final image layered in Image Blender

The first photos I started using in my designs were simple textures. (we’ve all seen the explosion of texture sites out there) but lately I’ve been using photos to get shapes that typically I would have drawn before. This has been largely driven by having a decent camera in my pocket at all times, allowing me to capture random staircases or light hitting the corner of an architectural feature just right. I find the natural light and texture in photographs have so much more depth in the final product then what I can come up with in photoshop …and its much easier to get to the end result.

Posted by: Seth Hardie
Instagram: @hallwood

Weekend Inspiration: Chloe Aftel

Posted by Jon M














My friend Cameron Ballensky has been in town visiting for a few days, so we’ve been out and about shooting loads of film. Me, mostly 35mm, him Polaroid. After seeing some of the unpredictable results yielded by certain films he uses, I was really turned on by the idea of exploring this format myself (also two of my favorite photographers, Reuben Wu and Neil Krug, have inspired this in me as well). Cameron mostly get’s all of his film through The Impossible Project, a company that now produces Polaroid film, and as I was exploring their site, I came across the beautiful work of Chloe Aftel, a Los Angeles based photographer and film director.

Browse through her beautiful body of work on Flickr.

Chloe is also part of The Impossible Project’s launch of a new instant film material for 8×10 cameras (image below). More info can be found here.