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Archive for the Architecture Category

Bunker 599

Posted by Jonathan






A World War II bunker in the Netherlands was turned into a sculptural visitor attraction by slicing it down the middle to reveal its insides. The bunker was built in 1940 to shelter up to 13 soldiers during bombing raids.

Intervention by Dutch studios RAAAF and Atelier de Lyon.

Movie shows concrete bunker cut in half by RAAAF and Atelier de Lyon from Dezeen on Vimeo.

Paul Rudolph Sketches + Efdemin Mix

Posted by Jakub

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Its hard to pick a favorite Paul Rudolph image, i’m just soo inspired every time I look his sketches, i’ve actually decided to get one tattooed on me.

Below is a Fact mix that i’ve been going back to, really solid and thought though, not just a bunch favorites slapped together, that seems to be the Dial way.


Tracklist:
1. Raymond Scott – Country Fair (Instrumental)
2. Dj Sotofett – Asa Med
3. Anthony Shake Shakir – Frayed
4. Perception – Abandoned Building In Mono
5. Max/Ernst – 7Klick1
5. Steevio – Ty (Deep Mix)
6. Furthr – Enta (enypnion)
7. DJ Qu – Times Like This
8. Black Jazz Consortium – Be And Not Know Why (feat. Christina Wheeler)
9. STL – Paku Paku
10. Jason Fine – Conical
11. Delroy Edwards – 4 Club Use Only
12. Ra. H – Spacepops
13. Gherkin Jerks – Midi Beats
14. Vakula – 41600
15. Delano Smith – Invitation Only (Reconstructed by Tobias.)
16. M-Core – Be Gene
17. Parallel 9 – Dominus
18. Echoplex – Soleil
19. tvhosten – Swinger EP
20. Acid Jesus – Radium
21. Lucy – Finegan (Pariah Rmx)
22. MLZ – One State
23. Jeroen – Axis
24. D5 – Run
25. Mark Ambrose – Bellringers
26. Phuture – Rise From Your Grave
27. Dream 2 Science – Dream 2 Science

L.A. 2013

Posted by Rob

The Los Angeles Times recently revisited their ‘L.A. 2013′ cover story from April 3, 1988 by making a PDF of the story available for download.

One of the ‘futurists and experts’ they spoke to for the story was the legendary Syd Mead, whose drawings accompanied the piece.

Lots of bold predictions of course, like your usual 200 story ‘mega rises’ and a sports utility vehicle that can adapt from a 2 seat sports car into a beach buggy via a ‘plug-in module.’

But the one that stuck with me gets dropped right in the first paragraph: “about a third of the residents have already headed out to their jobs, as required by Los Angeles County’s mandatory staggered work plan.”

YES PLEASE.

As an LA resident who had a horrible run-in with the 405 yesterday, I’m all for it. Make it so.

Side note: Tesla’s Elon Musk suggests we double deck the 405… thoughts?

Sheats/Goldstein evolution

Posted by Rob

The Sheats Goldstein house might be the most frequently photographed piece of property in LA (if you haven’t seen it on innumerable blogs like Curbed, or from the video walk through Charles posted awhile ago, you probably remember it from The Big Lebowski)—so obviously, I jumped at the chance to take a tour of the iconic house with architect Duncan Nicholson, who has been restoring and adding to the property since the ’90s. And as much as I tried to restrain my trigger finger, I took a ridiculous amount of photos to add to the home’s documentation—apologies for the seemingly endless scroll above.

Obviously, it’s an amazing house—but I’m most interested in its evolution through the ages. James Goldstein purchased the house in 1972, and then re-hired John Lautner to improve upon the house (and undo some questionable renovations)—the torch was passed to Nicholson, who has been carrying on the work to date.

Duncan started working for Lautner in 1989, and one of his first projects at the firm was to collaborate with James Turrell on his ‘Skyspace’ for the property. The corresponding concrete decks and walkways he designed that connect the house to the Skyspace take you on a near surreal procession through the rain forest-like gardens on the property.

He was also the project architect on the living room installation and designed most of the furniture, some of which was of course immortalized on film when The Dude sat there drinking his laced White Russian.

The plans for the most ambitious phase of the project, including a guest house, tennis court, nightclub and terrace, were shelved for almost 10 years after Lautner passed in 1994. Work on the project resumed in 2003 and has been ongoing ever since. Currently under construction is the nightclub that lives beneath what is arguably the most stunning tennis court in existence. All components of the addition make use of poured-in-place concrete, staying true to Lautner’s original aesthetic, one that somehow manages to make concrete feel warm and organic.

Thanks to David John for the introduction and many facts via his You Have Been Here Sometime interview with Duncan Nicholson.

Ward Roberts: Courts

Posted by Rob

Beautiful photos by Ward Roberts depicting various courts integrated into the urban landscape in near chameleon ways.

When living in Hong Kong I remember being amazed at how much area was offered up for court/pitch activities, given how short they are on space. Many of these are most likely far above street level, and while not necessarily “green areas,” they give back crucial space that was taken by construction.

Le Corbusier would be proud.

Via Freunde von Freunden.

Stacy Swiderski: Suburban Nights








New Jersey photographer Stacy Swiderski’s series Suburban Nights depicts aluminum-sided houses, above-ground pools, yards, and family cars shrouded in the purple light of dusk and the clear black of midnight. Illumination comes from sodium-yellow streetlamps, or fresh snowfall’s iridescent blue. The most noticeable thing about these photographs—apart from their silky, hyper-real color scheme—is their lack of people. Swiderski’s lonely landscapes carry a familiar melancholy for anyone who grew up in these sorts of places (myself included), and I can’t get enough of the eerie calm and—maybe I’m projecting here—subtle menace of her images.

Posted by: Todd Goldstein