Archive for the Architecture Category

Wall of Warburton House

BKK Architects is a great architectural firm based out of Melbourne, Australia (the house itself is located in Victoria). It seems a number of their residential projects utilize wood and lots of it. The vertical wall planks of the first few photos and slabs of rock of the chimney faintly remind me of mid-century housing.

Via Arch Daily

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Chicken Point Cabin

Locating a cabin on the side of an Idaho lake is one of the best decisions you could make. It just so happens that this cabin also has a window-wall which is 30 x 20 feet and opens the entire living space up to an amazing view of the lake. Although this looks more like a house, the interior and sleeping quarters and designed similar to that of a traditional cabin. It sleeps ten people.

Architectural firm: Olson Kundig Architects

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Villa Amanzi

Posted by Scott

Perched on a sea cliff in Phuket, Villa Amanzi is making me wish I was anywhere but home right now. The “luxury villa” hotel built in 2008 by architects Original Vision, is a spacious 2,644sm. I was going to throw this into the category of “stuff I can’t have” but then I looked at the rates/reservations page. If you go at the right time you can get the place for $2000/night, and it sleeps 12 people. That’s $166 / night each; not so crazy really. Now I just have to get back down to Thailand. Speaking of which, I was lucky enough to visit there once, I took some pictures.

Photos via Top Box Design

For Sale: The House From Ferris Bueller

Posted by Jakub

If I would have won the Mega Millions yesterday my first purchase would be this house. Reported by Paste Magazine, the home from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off is up for sale. Built in 1953, The Ben Rose House — located in Highland Park, Illinois — was designed by architects A. James Speyer and David Haid. The home is listed for $1.65 million, lets all pitch in and get it then drive a Ferrari off the back.

More info and a great picture gallery over at the Sotheby’s listing page

East Village Studio

Some of the most interesting homes aren’t those that are colossal. Take this East Village Studio in New York City for example. Sure its small apartment living but its also small, clean and minimal while having a warm, welcoming vibe. What more would you want in an apartment—besides an Eames chair.

I’m not sure about hiding my clothes in the stairs but at the point of creating a more spacious home it works. Is it just me or does this seem like an apartment that would be great for someone who’s a fan of Dieter Rams?

Josef Schulz

Posted by Alex

You may remember Josef Schulz’s series Sign Out from a while back. I was a big fan of that series, but these photographs, that focus on the subtle details of architecture, are much more intriguing to me. It’s all about the lines and the color. I am reminded of the work of Philipp Schaerer — that or video game architecture, where environmental details are obscured just enough to allow you to focus on the bad guys (or reduce processor load).

Using digital image processing, the analogue picture produced is then “cleansed” of the few remaining hints pointing to age, location or environment of the buildings. All details that might possibly allow conclusions concerning the actual size, users, time or place of the buildings are completely removed. The physical reality of the buildings is changed in such a way that they seem to become virtual blueprints designed to perfection.
— Excerpt from an essay by Thomas Ruff.

Lake Washington Residence

This Lake Washington Residence is a 4,000 square foot home designed by Miller Hull Architects. It was built on Mercer Island overlooking Lake Washington, just outside of Seattle. It faces outward from the edge of a steep hill and heavily forested area over the lake. The view alone is just as captivating as the actual house.

The main entrance of this residence is from the hillside above via a bridge to the third floor. The uppermost level of the residence is used as a place for guests to stay. The residence was designed to be naturally ventilated where the main staircase would pull air up and through the house. I do wonder how well insulated the home is.