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Box: A Live Performance Film

Posted by Jon M







We’ve truly entered an exiting era of new “user experiences” and no front is exempt. From web and mobile platforms, art installations, to film and video games, there seems to be a sense that no frontier is unreachable and what one day seemed impossible, has been surpassed beyond our wildest dreams, forever altering our perception on whats “real”. Enter Box.

Box is a live performance film by Bot & Dolly, that documents a first ever live synchronized performance using 3D Projection Mapping, Robots and Actors:

Box explores the synthesis of real and digital space through projection-mapping on moving surfaces. The short film documents a live performance, captured entirely in camera. Bot & Dolly produced this work to serve as both an artistic statement and technical demonstration. It is the culmination of multiple technologies, including large scale robotics, projection mapping, and software engineering. We believe this methodology has tremendous potential to radically transform theatrical presentations, and define new genres of expression.

About Bot & Dolly

Bot & Dolly is a design and engineering studio that specializes in automation, robotics and filmmaking.

Kickstarter: Wooden Pinhole Cameras

Posted by Jon M

PInhole_header_cargo1

Like Jakub mentioned in a previous post, here at ISO50 we try to share what we feel are interesting and worthy Kickstarter projects, so when I came across ONDU’s beautiful handmade Wooden Pinhole Cameras, I felt not only the need to share this on the blog, but pledge as well.

THE CAMERAS


ONDU 135 PANORAMIC PINHOLE
This camera combines the best of both worlds. It can shoot the regular Leica format in 36 mm x 24 mm or panoramic double frames at 72 mm x 24 mm image. It also hosts a 0,20 mm pinhole size and a focal length of 25 mm and a standard tripod mount. Great for taking amazing panoramic shots with a field of view of 113°.


ONDU 6X12 MULTIFORMAT PINHOLE
This is a multi-format all-in-one camera that can take 6 x 6, 6 x 9, and 6 x 12 images. It produces similar looking results as the ONDU 135 Panoramic but with much greater clarity, thanks to the 120 roll film. The camera has a pinhole size of 0.30 mm, a focal length of 40 mm and a standard tripod mount.


ONDU 135 POCKET PINHOLE
One of the smallest and lightest cameras around, this camera is still durable enough to outlast any of its digital counterparts. The ONDU 135 Pocket Pinhole camera is great for when you are shy on space and want to take it anywhere with you! It has a pinhole size of 0.20 mm, a focal length of 25 mm, and it comes with a standard tripod mount.


ONDU SLIDING BOX PINHOLE
A camera for the collector enthusiasts. It’s made with two sliding boxes that hold the paper in place for the exposure. This way, a single image is produced before heading to the darkroom or changing the paper in a changing bag. It uses a paper format of 12.8 x 18.7cm, has a 0.3 mm pinhole and a 50 mm focal length.


ONDU 4″ X 5″ LARGE PINHOLE
If you already know a thing or two about pinhole and large format photography, this is the perfect camera for you! It uses a standard 4˝ x 5˝ film holder that is secured snugly on the back with strong magnets. The camera has a 0.30 mm pinhole, a focal length of 60 mm and a standard tripod mount.


ONDU 6X6 POCKET PINHOLE
A tiny camera, given the fact that it uses 120 format film to expose an image! Like 135, it’s small enough to take it anywhere with you but takes images with a greater resolution. The camera has a pinhole size of 0.20 mm, a focal length of 25 mm and a standard tripod mount. Because it uses 120 film, the negatives on this camera are 56 mm x 56 mm, and the angle of view is an astonishing 115°.

Support ONDU Wooden Pinhole Cameras at Kickstarter

Theo Altenberg Paintings

Posted by Jon M









I’ve always been really passionate about painting and drawing, and when younger, these were disciplines I practiced quite often. Then (as with many of my generation and forward) the computer happened and the only “paint” I used was part of Microsoft’s software. Now after many years, I find myself wanting to return to those roots. This in part thanks to other designers that have inspired me to want to incorporate different mediums in to my work, such as Michael Cina for example, who in my opinion has proven that all of these disciplines can coexist within a designer and become part of a coherent (not that it has to be) body of work.

As I venture deeper in to the world of painting, I stumbled upon the beautiful work of German artist Theo Altenberg, which at first I actually thought was done by Cina himself (a comparison also noted by fellow design blog The Fox Is Black). His use of color is just amazing, and with so many details and textures, it is easy to find oneself getting lost in his pieces.