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Archive for October, 2009

Studio Update: October 2009

Posted by Scott

Akai MPD18

Akai MPD18


I usually hesitate to do music production related posts as the focus of this blog is more centered in the visual world (On a side note, I always wonder how many of you produce music as well as design? | Comment). But I’ve really been shifting gears lately into album mode, getting the studio all dialed in so the final stretch is as trouble free as possible. To tell the truth, this past year has been one giant computer headache. Photoshop has been running like a champ on Windows 7 64-bit, but Sonar — the audio software platform I use to record / produce with — has been nothing but trouble. Over the years, I’ve slowly moved to where I do all of my sound generation and most of my processing outside the computer with analog gear but I still use the computer to record and arrange. Sonar is still the central element to the most complex stage of the production process. If it’s not behaving, the whole chain breaks down very quickly. To be fair though, it’s actually the supporting cast of digital hardware that’s been causing all the problems, not Sonar itself. My analog-to-digital digital conversion system was built around a MOTU 828MKII audio interface and a MOTU MIDI timepiece. They worked great in Windows XP but just weren’t making the cut in Windows 7 and Vista. MOTU’s driver support for Windows is pretty bad, they’re more of a Mac-centric company. So I finally ditched them and went with German manufacturer RME’s Fireface 800 as the core of the system. RME were originally a Windows only hardware maker and are very dedicated to stable performance across both platforms. They also make some of the best analog to digital converters in the business so it was nice to get that upgrade included in the deal. I also finally took the time to really tweak the computer and chase down all the little bugs and conflicts so everything is running smoother than ever now. Unfortunately I had to leave the ridiculously fast Windows 7 and go back to Vista Pro x64, but it’s only a minor step down in performance so it’s well worth the added stability. I am betting I’ll be able to move back up to Win7 within the next 6 months. And before anyone says “you should switch to Mac” I must add that most of my go-to plugins and music software are PC-only, I couldn’t really switch to Mac if I wanted to. And believe me, over this past year I have wanted to on several occasions. But I think all that is behind me, the new rig is rock solid and I’ve cloned the drive with Acronis True Image so it will always be fast and clean (I can just flash the drive back to the initial state any time things start to bog down).

So now with everything working properly, all at once, for what seems like the first time in ages, it’s time to get down to the business of producing this album. I have all the material in place, it’s just a matter of arrangement and production at this point. I do enjoy this phase, when I’m in the middle of it, but truthfully I don’t always look forward to it. I just remember all the late nights up at 7am driving back and forth from LA and Sacramento getting stuff mixed and mastered, then mixed and mastered again, and again…. and so on. Sometimes it seems like it never ends. The last song I finished — the forthcoming Coastal Brake 12″ — was one of those very trying experiences. It was just such a dense and complex mix, I hit the wall a few times and really had to reconsider things. Luckily I was able to keep my head and after about two months of pushing and pulling I finally got a version I was happy with.

So here I am coming off that experience with a whole album’s worth of tracks all lined up for the same treatment. I figured it was time to evaluate my work flow and determine what I could do to optimize things and make the process more fun than work. I started by rewiring and reconfiguring the entire studio, from top to bottom, three times. With each pass I took a week to work with things and noted all the little issues and roadblocks that I encountered with the setup. I then incorporated those into the next redesign. I spent years trying to just get things setup quickly so I could get to work, not realizing that if I really took the time to get it all set up and configured properly the first time, in the end I would save a ton of time and energy.

So now I’m sitting in the newly optimized studio and it really feels good. My head is clear and I feel like I have instant access to all the tools I need to get work done. I’ve already written a chunk of new material in the past few days and am starting the process of working back through the existing songs and getting them into their finished forms. One very cool perk of this whole experience was rediscovering something that I had all but forgotten about from my earlier days as a musician. When I first started out in music, my first real piece of gear was an Ensoniq ASR-X, a combination drum machine / synth which used drum pads instead of keys. I sold it years ago and always regretted it (Actually, I sold one, got a new one, then sold that, then got another, then finally sold that again…but that’s a very long story). Anyways, I’ve always missed the physical drum pads and ever since I moved to San Francisco I can’t play my real drum kit very late at night anymore. Over the weekend I was at Guitar Center picking up some cables and noticed Akai’s new little drum trigger pad, the MPD18 (pictured at the top). Only $99 for 18 genuine MPC pads, that’s an insane deal. My ASR-X was always like the poor man’s MPC so I always lusted after them whenever I saw one at a show or something. I was a bit skeptical about whether the $99 MPD18 could live up to the venerable MPC, but once I got it home I was amazed at how sensitive and tactile the pads are. Needless to say, I’ve been loading my drum machine up and triggering it with the MPD for the past two days straight. It’s not even work anymore, I forgot how fun these things are, and I honestly think the results are more fluid and realistic than programming drum patterns by mouse.

I will be posting some pics of the new studio just as soon as I borrow my brother’s wide angle lens. For now, here is some gratuitous gear smut, the original MPC60 (Akai + Roger Linn) in all it’s glory:

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5 years of Hyperdub

Posted by Jakub

5 : 5 years of Hyperdub
The fabulous Hyperdub label turns 5 and unveils their 2xCD compilation thats full of exclusives and recent 12″ hits. Joker & Ginz touch on a West Coast sounding early 90′s monster that could be played in Pop clubs around the world, its like if you put Dam Funk in a NES game and drugged him up and only let him play low notes. Flying Lotus comes in running with his signature deep step that sways like a Kompakt shuffle track but heavier than a boot covered in thick mud. Samiyam joins the crew with more of a head nodding cut including long high pitch synth chords and dramatic melodies. 2000F & J Kamata brings us back to the late 80s roller skating rink jams in Oakland, CA with Osborne like vocoders and smash hit hooks and breaks. Quarta 330 takes Kode9 track and gives it a NES last level feel, plenty of deep space soldiers ready for battle once this track ends *presses A+B buttons together as fast as possible*.

Joker & Ginz – Stash

Flying Lotus – Disco Balls

Samiyam – Return

2000F & J Kamata – You Don’t Know What Love Is

Kode9 – 9 Samurai (Quarta 330 Rmx)

Non-Format Interview

Posted by Alex

non format
Non-Format is one of the most exciting studios working today. Comprised of Kjell Ekhorn (Norwegian) and Jon Forss (British), Non-Format is known for an exceptionally innovative approach to typography and a fresh, boundary-smashing graphic style. Clients such as Nike, Coca Cola and The New York Times have all tapped the studio’s award winning and internationally acclaimed design talent. Operating on two continents, Non-Format is based in Oslo, Norway and Minneapolis, USA.

One of my first assignments at design school was to bring in some books that I found inspiring. As I had just started the program, I didn’t really have much to show for myself, and I distinctly remember arriving that day to see that around 3/4 of the class had all brought the same book: Non-Format’s Love Song. The extent of their influence on the field of design became immediately clear to me. Since then I’ve kept a close watch on the studio and am always excited to see what they’ve been working on. Recently I had the privilege of interviewing Jon and Kjell and our exchange is after the jump.

Continue reading →

Ghostlycast 27: Slow Hands

Posted by Jakub

Cover Art by PhilistineDSGN & Taro Yumiba

Cover Art by PhilistineDSGN & Taro Yumiba


Ghostly International’s on going podcast series has had its share of diverse artists contributing monthly from Graphic Designers like You Work For Them to Detroit’s Hip Hop act Wajeed. This month Ghostly presents Worst Friends/Wolf + Lamb artist Slow Hands which you may know from our exclusive mix series, download and enjoy.

TRACKLIST
Naum Gabo – Volgograd
Mugwump – Stanza
A Mountain Of One – Bones (Way Of The Ancients Remix)
Jarvis Cocker – Discosong (Pilooski Mix)
Phreek Plus One – That’s It
Clap Rules – Old Sequencer – (Bostro Pesopeo Remix)
Motor City Drum Ensemble – Raw Cuts #6
TJ Kong – Music (The Clashing Egos Interpretation)
Break SL – Dirtbomb
Phreek Plus One – Astro Boogie (Sportloto Alpha Remix)
LCD Soundsystem – 45:33 (Padded Cell Remix)

DOWNLOAD THE MIX HERE

Ghostlycast 27: Slow Hands – Live From Autobrennt

They Live: Obey

Posted by Scott

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I came across some screencaps from John Carpenter’s 1988 They Live over at the excellent I love Hotdogs blog today (you may remember ILHD from the film titles post) and was immediately struck by the “Obey” scenes. Looks pretty familiar right? Cool to see the inspiration for Shepard Fairey’s Obey Giant campaign, looks like a terrible movie though. Although Roddy Piper cameos are always welcome.

Ripoff Failure: HP Envy 13

Posted by Scott

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I talked about the HP Envy a while back as a potential alternative to the Macbook and now it’s finally out. I’ve always been a fan of HP laptops, they’re fast and cheap and I’ve had three which have all served me well. But they were all ugly as hell and covered with useless add-ons and blue LEDs; not exactly objects of desire, just practical alternatives to the pricey Macs. So when I heard about the upcoming Envy line I was pretty excited at the prospect of a PC laptop alternative that didn’t suck. Unfortunately, as hard as HP tried to clone the Macbook experience, the Envy seems to have fallen short of the in almost every way. I guess it comes as no surprise, nobody does it like Mac. Gizmodo has all the details on the Envy, including more pics and a review. I think I’

Fontan+AMountain+MarbleSound+Eluvium

Posted by Jakub

Fontän
I feel in love with Information Records early last year once all the Studio remixes started to surface, since then they have released D. Lissik and Fontan. A ton of good spacey guitar noodlin’ in the best way, not one bad song out of that trio of bands.

I feel an even bigger psych rock movement(or maybe we should say moment) is about to happen, even bigger than the one we have now and one band that will take us there is the heavily 70′s influenced A Mountain of One.

Marble Sounds didn’t get much love when their EP was released BUT it was only a hand full of tracks, one track that I go back to is Good Occasions its a catchy alternative soft tune that builds nicely maybe even too nice, certain parts linger like a mid 90′s post rock song but the singers voice takes everything up a notch with his high pitch serenades.

I hope everyone that listens to ambient consistently has had a chance to sit with an Eluvium album, not just a song a whole album, he’s right up there with Loscil and Gas in my mind as someone that delivers a full on thought out release, always a beautiful surprise when a track like this pops up randomly at night on your player.

Fontän – Neanderthaler

A Mountain of One – Lie Awake

Marble Sounds – Good Occasions

Eluvium – New Animals From the Air

Michael Pollan’s Writing House

Posted by Scott

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Michael Pollan's Writing House
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Michael Pollan's Writing House


Author Michael Pollan (In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto and The Omnivore’s Dilemma) spoke at U.C. Berkeley’s Zellerbach Hall tonight. If you haven’t heard of his books, you may recognize him from the recent film Food, Inc. — which I highly recommended seeing.

In one of his books, A Place of My Own, Pollan describes how he personally, with no carpentry experience, built this small structure behind his house in Vermont. This whole thing might be ringing a bell if you read the Linda Aldredge post, but remember her tree house is a real, fully livable home, isolated in the woods, in a tree. She definitely wins the battle of priciple, but Pollan gets the honorable mention for pragmatism. Although how many people just happen to have an acre of woods in their backyard? Or happen to own an acre of raw forest for that matter… I think this is an east coast thing, the woods always look amazing out there.

This “writing house” — as he describes it — is a great concept and I am willing to bet it’s an incredibly productive environment. I often find that working in the same space as I live presents unique challenges to motivation and focus. This seems like a cost-effective alternative to having different addresses for your working and living spaces.

How many of you work primarily from home? Do you find there to be a conflict between convenience and distraction in the home work environment? Comment