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Archive for the Posters Category

Chinese Cultural Revolution Posters

Posted by Scott









These images are taken from a 1970′s era Chinese poster series entitled “Modernization Cannot Be Achieved Without Energy” (click for full versions). I love this illustration style; particularly the technical diagrams. I’m not sure if you can still score any copies, but they were for sale at The East is Red.

Via The East is Red

The Lovestep poster boys: Sepalcure

Posted by Jakub

Artwork by Sougwen Chung


With Dubstep branching out to see how far the genre can be pushed a ton of new ideas start to surface and a fusion of appealing sounds start melting together. One group i’m really excited about is Sepalcure which is a collaboration of Brooklyn’s Praveen and Machinedrum. the duo is doing a fine job of taking hints of soulful house and dubstep to create what they call Lovestep. One thing that Sepalcure has that other dubsteppers don’t usually have and ISO50 fans might also really enjoy is fine art direction by the multi talented designer Sougwen Chung. As you can see above and below her posters and videos of her work are a perfect fit for this heartfelt music.

Sepalcure’s debut performance alongside Untold, TRG, Pole, 2562 & more is February 13th at Unsound Festival NYC.

Below is a “Lovestep” mix done by Percussion Lab Founder/Sepalcure’s very own Praveen.

TRACKLIST
PangaeaMemories
BurialYou Hurt Me
TRGBroken Heart (Martyn Remix)
UntoldDante
DFRNTTripped (Synkro Mix)
SynkroInhale
SinesMemories Are Here
DFRNTTripped (Ital Tek Remix)
FaltyDLParty
Joy OrbisonJ. Doe
SepalcureDeep City Insects
Floating PointsK&G Beat

DOWNLOAD HERE

Sepalcure – Feeling That I Know So Well from sougwen on Vimeo.

Sepalcure – Every Day of my Life from sougwen on Vimeo.

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

North Korean Propaganda Posters

Posted by Scott











This set of North Korean propaganda posters was originally posted on Reddit today but the images were soon removed. I’ve mirrored them here and you can also find alternate mirrors along with translations at the original Reddit article. Pretty incredible these images made it to the outside world and the goat one seems so friendly. Here are the translations in case the original goes down:

· “When provoking a war of aggression, we will hit back, beginning with the US!”
· “Though the dog barks, the procession moves on!”
· “Death to US imperialists, our sworn enemy!”
· “Prevention and more prevention. Let’s fully establish a veterinary system for the prevention of epidemics!”
· “Let’s drive the US imperialists out and reunite the fatherland!”
· “Let’s extensively raise goats in all families!”
· “The US is truly an Axis of Evil.”
· “When we say we will, we will. We do not talk idly!”
· “Wicked Man.”
· “Do not forget the US imperialist wolves!”

Quadradao

Posted by Alex




I’m definitely getting way into this style right now; what can I say, people are doing some amazing things with type and shapes. These posters are by Quadradao out of Brazil. There is something familiar about the look of course, but I think it’s still fresh in its own way. What I find interesting about it is how much harder it is to design effectively in this style than it looks like. Sure it’s just type and shapes, but try and work something equally refined and see if you don’t go completely nuts.

Couldn’t find too much information on the studio, but from what I can deduce they’re chilling down in Brazil pumping out crazy good posters like these. If I had to guess I would have said these were straight out of the Netherlands.

Hey Ho

Posted by Alex






Gorgeous typographic works by French studio Hey Ho. I’m a big fan of this super regimented typographic chaos; a contradiction of terms I know, but looking at the pieces I think you know what I mean. Careful inspection usually reveals a tight grid and all of the placement feels *right*. I try to imagine adding or taking away elements and always find that Hey Ho has balanced things perfectly. Their work kind of reminds me of Experimental Jetset in an alternate typographic universe.

via Aisle One

Movie Posters of the Decade

Posted by Scott

1_FunnyGames_500
thebankjob
The_International_poster
flash-of-genius-os-810
9_Morvern_callar_535
6_AnythingElse_500

The Auteurs has a post on their picks for the top movie posters of the decade. Considering that the vast majority of modern movie posters fall short of the standards set in heyday of film, this must have been a difficult list to assemble and a boring task to complete. Nevertheless, they have managed to dig up a few gems. Good to see The Bank Job in there — always a favorite — but I was pleasantly surprised by Funny Games, hadn’t seen that one.

Can you think of any obvious omissions from this list? Let us know in the comments

For some background, more good movie posters from years past can be found in these older posts: 50 Beautiful Movie Posters, 100 Greatest Movie Posters, and, of course, SOLARIS!.

Via The Auteurs

Pan Am’s “Helvetica Dream”

Posted by Alex

panam
panam2
panam3
panam4
Determined to find out the history behind these beautiful posters, Frederico Duarte did some extensive research and learned how “Pan Am’s short-lived Helvetica dream” came to be. He chronicles this process over on the Eye Blog and in an article for Eye Magazine. These posters are incredible and their story is well worth the endless emails and phone calls he had to make to determine their origin.

Pan Am is no longer. But the story of its redesign, as told by the people behind it, proves personal connections, proximity and chance are all makers of (design) history. How many other great design stories are left untold?

Fredrico’s post reads like a design mystery and I lamented how little of this research I do, or even curiosity I possess when I come across work that interests me. For example: I wake up, see something amazing on FFFFOUND, then I bookmark it. End of story. If it’s especially awesome maybe I blog about it, but I rarely dive deep into whatever visual universe I’ve uncovered. I usually just absorb it quickly, then move on with a slightly augmented sense of visual understanding. This is why I both love and hate sites like Dropular or FFFFOUND. While they allow me to quickly consume lots of high quality design, they remove context and discourage the exploration that would otherwise go along with finding out about a new artist. (Of course there are many benefits to sites like these, but the removal of the ‘story’ that goes along with the work is one of the primary downsides.)

As Fredrico mentions in his article, the research was done for an SVA class where the rule is “No Google”. I thought this was interesting because I tend to use Google and “research” interchangeably, especially when thinking about design. To be stripped of my only research tool! Of course this makes sense these days, as most of us young designers primarily exist on the web anyway (which is a scary thought if you think about it…if the hardrives go, so do I). What the story hammered home for me was the importance and overwhelming benefits of a design education. What allowed Fredrico to take this much time plunging into the depths of design history (and what allowed me to spend so much time with Playboy) was the freedom and time provided by the design education environment. While you could always try and inspire yourself to do this on your own, it’s hard to beat limitless boundaries coupled with external motivation.