Archive for the Inspiration Category

Reverse Of Volume

Posted by Jon M

Reverse Of Volume was an installation by artist Yatsuaki Onishi commissioned by Rice Gallery, which ran from April 13 – July 27 2012. The suspended fabricated mountainscape is formed from two materials; plastic sheeting and black colored hot-glue. Onishi shaped the floating sculpture within the gallery space by first draping the expansive plastic piece over stacked cardboard boxes, then removing the piled components following the white sheet having been attached to the ceiling by the quick-drying adhesive. This creative process or method is known to Yasuaki Onishi as ‘casting the invisible’ and aids in his artistic meditation on the reality of negative space.

Weekend Inspiration: Chloe Aftel

Posted by Jon M

My friend Cameron Ballensky has been in town visiting for a few days, so we’ve been out and about shooting loads of film. Me, mostly 35mm, him Polaroid. After seeing some of the unpredictable results yielded by certain films he uses, I was really turned on by the idea of exploring this format myself (also two of my favorite photographers, Reuben Wu and Neil Krug, have inspired this in me as well). Cameron mostly get’s all of his film through The Impossible Project, a company that now produces Polaroid film, and as I was exploring their site, I came across the beautiful work of Chloe Aftel, a Los Angeles based photographer and film director.

Browse through her beautiful body of work on Flickr.

Chloe is also part of The Impossible Project’s launch of a new instant film material for 8×10 cameras (image below). More info can be found here.

Weekend Inspiration: Motoi Yamamoto

Posted by Jon M

Japanese artist Yamamoto Motoi was born in Hiroshima, Japan in 1966 and worked in a dockyard until he was 22, when he decided to focus on art full-time. Six years later, in 1994, his younger sister died from complications due to brain cancer and Yamamoto immediately began to memorialize her in his labyrinthine installations of poured salt. The patterns formed from the salt are actually quite literal in that Yamamoto first created a three-dimensional brain as an exploration of his sister’s condition and subsequently wondered what would happen if the patterns and channels of the brain were then flattened.

Although he creates basic guidelines and conditions for each piece, the works are almost entirely improvised with mistakes and imperfections often left intact during hundreds of hours of meticulous pouring. After each piece has been on view for several weeks, the public is invited to communally destroy each work and help package the salt into bags and jars, after which it is thrown back into the ocean.

Via Colossal