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Archive for the Cameras Category

Fiji Vignettes

Posted by Charles

Here’s a beautiful 3 part vignette shot by director Riley Blakeway of Taj Burrow and friends in Fiji. Filming in a place like this, with surfers of this caliber, you’d expect it to look great and it does. Riley goes a little further to make it something else with the color and grain work, which I really appreciate. All three pieces have a great organic film-like grain and the color grading is spot. A feeling and look that you can’t just do with a plug-in.

When I first watched it, I was convinced this was 16mm and maybe super 8mm in spots. Here’s the kicker, “All of the surf vision was shot with the EX1.” says Blakeway. He also added that intros and outros were super 8mm. The camera is the Sony PMW-EX1, a type of camera that is similar to what a lot of us were used to shooting with before the Canon DSLR days. Not a 5D, 60D or even a RED Epic, which is great to see. I’ll try not to get into the technical too much on this, because it’s simply well shot, well edited and graded. His attention to detail is great on these, well done Riley.

Lytro Light Field Camera

Posted by Jon



Lytro released its revolutionary Light Field Camera last week. Apart from its unique design, the camera uses a different type of sensor to capture light fields, allowing photographers to focus images after shooting them. It also allows users to capture three-dimensional shots with a single lens. Check out their picture gallery for a chance to see light fields in action.

I can see this technology being particularly useful in point-and-shoots and Blade Runner-esque “enhance” sequences, but I’m really interested in its creative applications. On one hand it takes away from the artistic choices available to photographers, but on the other hand it opens up a whole new set of possibilities. Either way it will be interesting to see what people come up with.

Lytro via All Things D

Making of Dubai 45 Gigapixels

Posted by Jon



The GigaPan EPIC Pro received a firmware update last week. You may remember the hardware from Gerald Donovan’s 45 gigapixel panoramic photo of Dubai (the making of which is included above), which happened to turn one year old that same week. To celebrate the occasion, Gerald has re-rendered the image to correct for stitching errors in the original file. If you missed it the first time, or if you are interested in checking out the updated version, you can view it here. Alternatively, you can check out the original forty-fiver here.

Convert 8mm with the Canon 5D Mark II






Super 8 and 8mm have always been my favorites when shooting video. Although transferring the film to digital has posed problems mainly because of its expense and decline in locations to transfer. The video above by James Miller shows his method for transferring 8mm footage to digital using the beloved 5D Mark II and an Eumig Mark 501 (or the Eumig 610D & the Eumig Mark DL). The end result looks great, is much much faster and way less expensive. Now I just need to get a 1D Mark IV or 5D Mark II.

Hit the jump for more information on the process and the transfer results.

Continue reading →

Camera Futura

Posted by Scott





Oh how I wish the 31 megapixel, full frame sensor Camera Futura camera phone were real. Unfortunately it’s just a design study by Seattle firm Artefact Group. According to the concept, the sensor is housed within the lens which continues to function when removed from the body, thus allowing the screen to be used as a remote viewer. Renderings are all well and good, Artefact went so far as to stage a fake CES demonstration of the device for this video:

The video seems to have raised the ire of many a tech-blog commenter, and led many to believe this was just some elaborate hoax. But Artefact states that “we created these assets to spark a discussion around the question of “what if” the product was really available”. I hope something like this comes along sooner than later, I give it 10 years if they were even able to find a big enough market for such a device. I honestly can’t imagine the average cell phone user caring about interchangeable lenses and full frame sensors. Or wanting to lug around a big hunk of glass all the time.