Archive for the Architecture Category

Casa Kimball Vacation Villa

Casa Kimball is the ultimate getaway house that we all wish to acquire sometime in our lifetime. The house is situated on a cliff alongside the beautiful Atlantic Ocean coastline and clocks in at an outstanding 20,000 square feet in size.

The house is also accompanied by a long seamless-edge pool and hot tub. However, I don’t see a floating green like I would hope. Perhaps when paying the $4,000 daily or $24,500 weekly rate to rent out the house, they would accommodate that desire.

Besides this house being enormous, I’m particularly interested in the way the architect intended light to be a part of the design. It would be great to see photos from the inside of the house looking through the grated wall during sunset and also looking out of the side slots in the house during sunrise.

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Porsche Museum

Posted by Scott

The Porsche Museum in Zuffenhausen, Germany is nothing short of mind blowing. The ultra-clean, super-minimal building houses over 80 exhibits chronicling the auto-maker’s rise to prominence. The whole thing leans pretty futuristic, would have liked to have seen a few classic cues here and there, but I’m certainly not complaining. Has anyone been yet? Looks like a must-see if you’re anywhere near Stuttgart.

Porsche Museum via Designlenta

Zipper house

It always seemed odd to me that I never see these beautiful houses while out and about. But then again, if you have the money to build an amazing house, chances are you’ll have the money to properly gate it or purchase secluded property. In this case though, this house was built smack dab on a steep hill just outside of Seattle.

After coming across the house on Deforest Architect’s website I realized that I had seen it before while it was being constructed. By its looks at the time, it appeared substantially nicer than any of the surrounding houses. Because of that I had assumed it was an oddly placed office building rather than a home.

As you go inside the house it opens up with a modern, metal and wood theme. The wood is even complimented by the metal of two turntables and a mixer atop a small, raised cove above the living room.

Note: There is a skateboard deck giveaway going on at Wanken right now, you can enter here.

Swiss Holiday House

Houses like this one outside of Rigi-Scheidegg, Switzerland just make my jaw drop. The view is simply stunning. There is nothing like being able to look out above your neighbors’ houses, through a 5-meter long window or in the lawn chairs on the deck and still see a mountain range with snowcapped peaks every morning. You just couldn’t ask for a more beautiful view.

Parts of the house utilize a lower ceiling to help give it that mountain hut vibe. It’s also helped by the cement and wood combination, giving a super raw feel. It’s almost too raw which doesn’t make the house feel all that comforting. A little interior flare would warm it up and make it more welcoming. Perhaps some deer head mounts on the wall or large floor rugs would do the trick.

Found in the archives of Arch daily.

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Prada Building // Aoyoma, Tokyo

Posted by Alex

I spent today walking around Aoyoma, a fairly upscale shopping district near Harajuku in Tokyo. One of the more distinctive features of the area is the Prada building, designed by the Swiss duo Herzog & de Meuron. It was really hot walking around it and staring up at the sun, but I couldn’t resist the opportunity to shoot such a cool looking structure. The way the glass warps the interior while simultaneously reflecting the exterior makes for some really interesting compositions. From immediately below, looking up at the sky, the building kind of resembles bubble wrap, or perhaps the bottom of an almost boiling pot. My favorite part is the color contrast of the cross sections, between the black of the edges and the off-white of the supports. The attendants inside kept tossing me suspicious glances, once they figured out I was *not* there to buy anything.

I passed by this evening as well and the building looked awesome in a completely different way. Kind of like a 24 hour bee hive. Unfortunately I didn’t have my camera; I would have really liked to round out the photo group with a few night shots. On an unrelated note, I didn’t have my camera because I was on the way to a Mike Stern concert at the Blue Note. If you are remotely into progressive jazz guitar at all, check out his music. He and the band (especially bassist Richard Bona) really tore the roof off the place tonight.

Michaels/Sisson Residence

Miller/Hull designed this house for a young couple that had a high interest in modern architecture. The completed house fits perfectly with the Pacific Northwest theme and is situated in the woods of Mercer Island near Seattle.

Personally it’s one of my favorites in the Pacific Northwest. The ratio of wood to metal beams/siding seems nicely balanced, especially on the deck.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater House

The Fallingwater house was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built during 1934-1937 in Mill Run, Pennsylvania. The house was originally a weekend home for Edgar Kaufmann and his family. Over time the house has become a historic landmark and also known as one of the most well known residences in the United States by the American Institute of Architects.

Wright’s goal for this house was to make man and nature harmonious, much like Japanese architecture. Instead of building the house alongside the waterfall like the Kaufmann family originally had planned, Wright designed the house to sit directly on top of the falls. The house then became part of the falls; the sounds of the water echoing throughout the entire house.

Images via Arch Daily.