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Westvaco Inspirations

Posted by Jon








These fantastic spreads were designed by Bradbury Thompson for Westvaco Inspirations in the 1950s and early 60s.

Westvaco Inspirations was a graphic arts publication issued by the Westvaco Corporation, formerly named the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company, with the objective of showing typography, photography, art work and other graphic inventiveness on papers manufactured at its mills. Because Westvaco Inspirations was intended to demonstrate printing processes and papers, its primary audience consisted of 35,000 designers, printers, teachers and students.

Thompson designed more than sixty issues of the magazine over eighteen years and utilized a variety of printing methods, including letterpress and offset lithography. Tons more great scans at Typogabor.

via Matthew Lyons

To the Moon

Posted by Jon






Sci-Fi-O-Rama has some gorgeous scans from Time-Life’s To the Moon, “an audio and visual chronology that documents NASA’s Mercury, Gemini and (of course) Apollo projects.” It includes 6 doubled sided vinyls of interviews and famous radio transmissions as well as a 190 page slip case book, which these scans come from.

Be sure to check out the rest here.

United Nations Stamps

Posted by Jon






Amy Henderson of AQ-V recently acquired a large collection of old United Nations stamps:

Because the UN is an international organization, its stamp must bear symbols that will be recognized universally. Besides the beauty of the design, the UN Design Committee must consider the political implications of any symbolism used. Naturally none of them can stand for anything contrary to the standards and principles of the United Nations, nor can they represent any one culture, religion, or race.

It was the Design Committee’s suggestion that the official five languages—Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish—should be used on as many of the stamps as possible. This was the origin of the “five-language border” which has become characteristic of UN stamps.

This set is the first post in a multi-part series, and I can’t wait to see the rest. In the meantime you can check out David McFarline’s flickr collection or previous posts for more stamp goodness.

via AQ-V

Marina Branch Library X Old SF

Posted by Jon







I could spend hours going through the Old S.F. website. Some interesting ones I found were the San Francisco Civic Auditorium, Union Square, Hunters Point, and Seals Stadium, but my favorite set has to be these interior shots of the Marina Branch Library.

Marina Branch Library was the 23rd branch established in the San Francisco Public Library system and originally opened to the public in 1954. It was designed by the architectural firm of Appleton and Wolfard at a cost of $156,742. Furnishings cost an additional $12,926.

Recently the branch underwent renovations and reopened in 2007 at a cost of $3.9 million. It’s a shame that libraries and offices rarely look like this anymore. Anyone else find any hidden gems on the site and care to share?

via Old S.F.