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Bertone Design

Originally an Italian coach builder and manufacturer, Gruppo Bertone ultimately became renowned for their progressive automotive design. Starting with the legendary Lamborghini Miura in the late 1960′s, Bertone’s designers were commissioned by many Italian carmakers of the day for both concept and production based cars. The late 70′s and early 80′s brought critical success and some of what I feel were their best designs, known for their distinct wedge profile and futuristic accents. Pictured above are some examples of work they did for Lancia, Fiat, Ferrari, Lamborghini, Volvo, Alfa Romeo, Maserati, and BMW.

-Rory

The Canadian Architect Covers (1964-67)














Just came across this great Flickr set of The Canadian Architect covers from 1964-67, designed by Laszlo Buday.

Also, sorry for the abscence of this weeks’s Weekend Inspiration post. I’ve been helping out Tycho with the first leg of this summer tour dates, so haven’t had much time to post, but next Friday it’s back to business as usual.

Posted by Jonathan (B3PO)

Weekend Inspiration: Reuben Wu










I just recently found out that Reuben Wu, aside from being a British DJ, producer and keyboardist for Ladytron, was also an avid photographer. Apparently the story goes that he started getting a bit more serious about photography when he decided to document his personal tour experiences and making the most out of being a musician on the road, while visiting some remarkable locations. Since then, he’s has amassed an impressive collection of cameras, which he has modified, spliced and pushed to their limits, all in the name of experimentation and discovery. This has resulted in a diverse and unusual and almost other-worldy like body of work, from urban architecture, to desert and remote landscapes.
Be sure to check out more of Reuben’s amazing on his Flickr.

Big thanks to Wendy Stenzel at NEST Artists for supplying the photos and info regarding Reueben Wu.

Posted by B3PO (Jonathan Marsh)

Weekend Inspiration: Leif Podhajsky




















The amazing work of Australian artist and creative director Leif Podhajsky has been posted about here on the blog before, but I thought I would feature him again, this time as the subject of this week’s Weekend Inspiration. I have found myself revisiting his portfolio frequently over the past few weeks, In particular for his amazing album covers, as I’m working on a few myself.

He also launched the Melt Blog and has been experimenting with video and visuals.

Posted by B3PO

Weekend Inspiration: Paul Davies
















Fascinated by the work of Paul Davies, an Australian architectural-landscape painter and sculptor. Can’t help but to find some parallels between his work and Scott’s, who both seem to have the ability to create “dream-like sequences”, through the manipulation of layers, color and texture.

In the words of Paul himself:

Much of this work has been sourced from my recent visits to America and Europe. During these visits I examined The Eames House and Schindler House, both in Los Angeles, Frank Sinatra’s holiday retreat in Palm Springs, The Bauhaus in Dessau and The Villa Savoye in Poissy. I have also visited the modernist buildings in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, by Van Mollyvan, who spent time training under Le Corbusier. Gaining access to these sites often takes many requests as some of the buildings are privately owned. I was interested in these examples of international landscapes and architecture because of the striking, atmospheric qualities I could capture when photographing them. To amplify these images, I collaged them with sourced landscape photographs, of North America’s West Coast, by Ansel Adams. Adams’s photographs, with their crisp cinematic quality, allowed me to play with the composition and to stage dramatic, non- existent scenes. The photographic images reminded me of typical holiday postcards and I have attempted to capture this in my work by intensifying the perspectives and altering the colour ways.

Although the scenes and structures that inhibit them seem picturesque, in reality, these iconic homes can often feel austere and isolated. My work investigates these images as portraits of space, devoid of human form, inviting the viewer to generate their own emotional response to the painting. The absence of people in my work encourages the viewer to wander uninterrupted through the space and appreciate the built and non-built qualities of the surrounding environment. Through my practice I have attempted to explore this concept of isolation by incorporating empty swimming pools in the picture. Throughout my school years I swam competitively and was fascinated by the vacant feeling of the outdoor pools when they were drained for winter. I recently visited David Hockney’s underwater swimming pool mural, painted in the 1980’s for The Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles. Hockney’s work addresses issues of space and location, and his swimming pool design is a brilliant 3D version of these concepts. This year I designed a version of Hockney’s mural, for my Father’s swimming pool, and the experience was helped by the understanding of space I learnt from my Sculpture study at NSW College Of Fine Arts. By creating my paintings devoid of people, “emptying” the swimming pools and “burning” the forests, I am attempting to convey this dislocation to the viewer and raise environmental concerns that face us today.

Posted by B3PO