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CHVRCHES By Chad Kamenshine

CHVRCHES

Lauren Mayberry - CHVRCHES

Iain Cook - CHVRCHES

Martin Doherty - CHVRCHES

CHVRCHES

CHVRCHES

Lauren Mayberry - CHVRCHES

Iain Cook - CHVRCHES

CHVRCHES

Lauren Mayberry - CHVRCHES

CHVRCHES

Martin Doherty - CHVRCHES

CHVRCHES

Lauren Mayberry - CHVRCHES

CHVRCHES

CHVRCHES at Union Pool

CHVRCHES

I first bumped into a bubbly CHVRCHES at Firefly Festival in 2013 on a shoot with SPIN Magazine. After this random encounter came countless live shoots and I even had the opportunity to spend a day with them in Brooklyn.

Throughout the tour, photographer Rachael Wright captured some great, intimate footage including a snippet from the Star Wars shoot that can be seen in the video for “Get Away” above.

As they head into the studio to record the followup to ‘Bones’ – here’s a look back at some of my favorite moments from the past couple of tours.

Check out and follow more of my work on Instagram and Facebook

-c

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lauren Mayberry by Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado Illustration

Lucy Salgado is an illustrator based out of Recife, Brazil. I first came across Lucy’s work when CHVRCHES posted an illustration she crafted of Lauren Mayberry on Instagram.

After trading emails back forth we talked about the possibility of collaborating on a project for The Artistree. We came up with the idea of illustrating elements from some of our favorite releases of 2014 and mashing them all together for what would become the imagery for our end of the year pieces.

Check out and follow Lucy’s work on Tumblr, Facebook and Instagram

-Chad Kamenshine

Moments By Chad Kamenshine

Chad Kamenshine

Lorde

Darkside

Future Islands

Lauren Mayberry (CHVRCHES)

Paul Banks (Interpol)

Tycho

Mike Shinoda (Linkin Park)

Beacon

White Lung

The Knife

Young Magic

CHVRCHES

Zola Jesus

Widowspeak

Deerhoof

A few months ago, I was asked this simple question: “Would you want to shoot their portrait?”

Looking back, this is the moment when all the dominoes started to fall. I’ve always had something to say, but I felt as if the message wasn’t getting through. Shooting portraits has finally given me the platform to vocalize my vision, and since then it’s been pretty insane. I’ve been fortunate enough to collaborate and share experiences with some of the most amazing people. The best part? I’ve made lifelong friends, all because I just took someone’s photograph.

2014 – An unforgettable year, revisited here.

Chad Kamenshine

Lost Lunar Photos

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The visual mood of the blog these days, especially the black and white images in Tim Navis’ new portfolio made me recall a post I saw on WIRED a few months ago.

Between 1966 and ’67, five Lunar Orbiters snapped pictures onto 70mm film from about 30 miles above the moon. The satellites were sent mainly to scout potential landing sites for manned moon missions. Each satellite would point its dual lens Kodak camera at a target, snap a picture, then develop the photograph. High- and low-resolution photos were then scanned into strips called framelets using something akin to an old fax machine reader.

View the complete set of photos and read the interesting story behind how the images were restored by the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project here.

Posted By: Owen Perry

Nicola Odemann: Inspired by Iceland

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Nicola Odemann has put together another amazing 35mm film set from her recent trip to Iceland. I first found Nicola’s work through her Cargo Collective site about a few years ago, but just now realized she’s also picked-up an Instagram account. Always loved her use of 35mm film, and I love the story about the camera coming from her father. Definitely follow her, as I suspect much more amazing beauty and inspiration from Nicola in the future @wildsommer

Want more? Here’s some interviews with Nicola and collections of her outstanding work:

http://cargocollective.com/Montagne/Nicola-Odemann
http://abirdfliesby.blogspot.ch/2012/08/nicola-odemann.html
http://www.frankie.com.au/blogs/photography/nicola-odemann-photography-interview

Posted By: Owen

Luigi Ghirri

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Luigi Ghirri (1943 – 1992) was an Italian photographer and writer who pioneered colour photography in the vein of conceptual and contemporary art. Although he was recognized and exhibited extensively while alive, full appreciation for his work has occurred posthumously. You can read a more extensive bio and view more of his images here and here.

I find his work appealing primarily because of the nostalgic colours of Kodachrome film, but also for his compositions. He definitely had a certain wit about him, as well as an ability to see and capture moments that others might otherwise miss. As one article states, “…His pictures are not acts of mimesis or replication but ways of exploring reality. They are investigations of the unknown and examine the spiritual and the immaterial world. Photography for Ghirri was a form of poetry and a means of communication; it was a mental habitat where boundaries and territories intersect and fluctuate…”

Posted by: Owen

Jakob Wagner: Aerialscapes

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Behold the aerialscapes of young German photographer, Jakob Wagner. I love the consistency of Wagner’s editing style and color pallets — he does a fantastic job of enhancing textures and shadow details while still keeping the photographs looking clean and natural. It goes without saying, but the locations he’s captured are also truly outstanding.

I highly recommend you check out his portfolio for more of this visual candy.

Posted by: Owen

Lytro Illum Light Field Camera

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You may remember seeing the first Lytro light field camera here on the blog back in 2011. If its unconventional box-like shape wasn’t enough to catch your eye, the astounding technology that enabled photographers to adjust the focal point of the image after it had already been captured surely would have. Check out an example below, you can click to change the focal point and scroll to zoom in and out. There are more samples on Lytro’s Gallery page.

Well, now Lytro is back with the next evolution of the light field camera: the Lytro Illum. Physically, it appears much more in-line with traditional point-and-shoot cameras than its radical predecessor, with an angled display screen that gives the profile of the camera big points on both character factor and, I’d imagine, ergonomics. I’ve also read in some hands-on reviews that it feels remarkably light, weighing in at less than two pounds…yes, that lens that looks like a cumbersome beast apparently weights only half a pound.

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As pretty as the Illum is on the outside, it isn’t until you take a look at what’s inside that you can get a sense for how revolutionary this camera really is. The Illum uses a patented micro-lens array that captures data about color, light direction and intensity, storing this data for later use. This is the key difference between light field cameras and other cameras, which generally don’t give you much control over the photo once it’s been taken. A special Lytro button enables a helpful UI overlay that outlines the contours of objects in the shot, giving a sense of depth and a preview of how the image’s focus will be able to be adjusted by its viewers.



Perhaps the biggest kicker of all is the price tag. Looking at a piece of technology as revolutionary as this, you might instantly assume that it’s going to run tens of thousands of dollars. Wrong. It’s being listed at around $1,599 USD, which isn’t exactly cheap, but in the photography field it actually is very affordable. In his original post, Jon finished it off by opening the table for ideas on how this technology could be applied to great effect. One can’t help but think of all the possibilities when you look at technology like this: how would you use the Lytro Illum differently than you would your usual camera? Or, which of your favorite photographers would you like to see use a camera like this?

You can read more on the Lytro Illum on Engadget and The Verge
Posted by: Alex Koplin via Mani Nilchiani